Truck damages part of Peru's World Heritage site, the Nazca lines

A truck driver has been accused of damaging part of the world-renowned Nazca lines in Peru.

The nation's ministry of culture said Jainer Flores drove into an unauthorised section of the UN World Heritage site on Saturday, leaving tracks and damaging part of three lines.

The Nazca lines are huge etchings depicting imaginary figures, creatures and plants that were scratched on the surface of a coastal desert between 1,500 and 2,000 years ago.

They are believed to have had ritual astronomical purposes.

Greenpeace activists damaged the lines by leaving footprints in the adjacent desert during an event in 2014.

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