Thousands join new Egypt protest

Thousands join new Egypt protest

Thousands of people have poured into central Cairo’s Tahrir Square for what they called a “second revolution”, calling for Egypt’s military rulers to speed up the pace of democratic reforms.

Christians and Muslims took turns praying in Tahrir Square, as they did in the protests that forced the removal of former president Hosni Mubarak in February. Sectarian clashes have turned deadly since the revolution.

The ruling military warned that “dubious” elements might try to cause chaos during the protests, and said it would stay clear of the area to avoid any friction.

Mohamed ElBaradei, the Egyptian Nobel Peace Prize winner and a reform leader, said that he was “seriously concerned about the absence of security forces”.

The military’s leadership of the country’s democratic transition has left many protesters dissatisfied.

Some critics accuse the military rulers of collaborating with the former regime and being too lenient in its prosecution of Mubarak, his family and regime members. Mubarak faces trial on charges of conspiring to kill protesters.

The Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s best organised political force, opposed the protest and called it an attempt to drive a wedge between the military and the people. The Brotherhood’s absence will test the ability of liberal and secular groups to launch their own sustained opposition movement.

Some liberal groups are calling for planned parliamentary elections, now set for September, to be pushed back so that they will have more time to prepare. The Brotherhood, however, stands to make major gains and wants the vote to go ahead.

The protest movement wants to oust the ruling Armed Forces Council and replace it with a civilian council. Protesters accuse the army of using excessive force in cracking down on peaceful protesters since Mubarak’s removal, sending thousands to military tribunals and detaining young protesters.

A joint statement by four liberal and secular groups called for postponing the September elections, drafting basic principles that guarantee that Egypt is a civil state and ending military tribunals.

The statement reflects worries of many political groups that the Brotherhood is poised to win a big portion of parliament.

The Brotherhood, banned in 1954, became a political force after renouncing violence in the 1970s. Eventually it became the most formidable opponent to Mubarak’s regime, though it was still banned as a political party.

More on this topic

Egypt clamps down on sale of yellow vests in bid to foil protestsEgypt clamps down on sale of yellow vests in bid to foil protests

13 killed during Egypt clashes13 killed during Egypt clashes

Clooney: I was threatened with arrest in EgyptClooney: I was threatened with arrest in Egypt

Three Al-Jazeera journalists granted retrialThree Al-Jazeera journalists granted retrial


More in this Section

US to proceed with first federal execution in almost 20 yearsUS to proceed with first federal execution in almost 20 years

New Zealand mosque shooter sacks lawyers ahead of sentencingNew Zealand mosque shooter sacks lawyers ahead of sentencing

Covid-19 patients can suffer serious heart damage – studyCovid-19 patients can suffer serious heart damage – study

21 injured after explosion and fire on US navy ship21 injured after explosion and fire on US navy ship


Lifestyle

Conservationist Giles Clark takes on the illegal wildlife trade, as well as the task of building a bear sanctuary in Laos, South-east Asia, in BBC Two series Bears About The House.Five minutes with ... Giles Clark

Forget G-spots. Let's focus on the C-spot and close the orgasm gap once and for all.Sex File: The G-spot is dead. Long live the C-spot

Workshop leaders from the West Cork Literary Festival offer tips for writing in areas such as biography, short stories and travel, writes Des O’DriscollSo you want to be a writer?

'He told us we were so scared of dying, we forgot how to live” - Guru: The Dark Side of Enlightenment is this week's podcast pickPodcast Corner: Guru tells of sweat-lodge tragedy and James Arthur Ray

More From The Irish Examiner