The man who created the Big Mac has died aged 98

Michael “Jim” Delligatti – the man credited with creating the McDonald’s Big Mac burger – has died. He was 98 years old.

McDonald’s spokeswoman Kerry Ford confirmed that the Pittsburgh-area franchisee died at home surrounded by his family on Monday night.

Delligatti’s franchise was based in Uniontown when he invented the chain’s signature burger with two all-beef patties, “special sauce”, lettuce, cheese, pickles and onions on a sesame seed bun.

Delligatti said in 2006 that the company weren’t initially on board with the idea because its simple line-up of hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes was doing well as it was.

But he wanted to offer a bigger burger – and it went down so well that it spread to the rest of his 47 outlets, and eventually went national in 1968.


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