Six-year-old Alfie donates pocket money in superhero tin to Grenfell victims

Six-year-old Alfie donates pocket money in superhero tin to Grenfell victims

A six-year-old boy has handed over his pocket money to help the victims of the deadly Grenfell Tower blaze.

Alfie Lindsey visited the estate in west London on Sunday and donated a superhero-themed tin filled with cash he had collected to the Bishop of Kensington, Graham Tomlin.

Dad Arthur said his son was moved to give his money to those in need after watching the tragedy on television. He estimated around £60 to £70 was in the money box.

"I felt a little bit worried," Alfie told the Press Association when quizzed about what he had seen reported in the news. He said he felt "sad" for the people who lived there.

After making the journey from their Hounslow home, Mr Lindsey said he was "cut up" when his son said he wanted to give his cash to the victims.

"I am proud of him. It was such a warm feeling, a warm glow when he handed over the cash," he said of his son, who wants to be a policeman.

"It was the morning after when he said he wanted to give his money box. They said they needed donations and he said 'I want to give my money box', so that's what we decided to do."

After the fire ravaged the 24-storey block in the early hours of Wednesday, Scotland Yard has said at least 58 have died, or are missing, presumed dead.

Many others have lost their homes as a result of the blaze, which has gutted the tower and left it charred and virtually destroyed.

Bishop of Kensington Mr Tomlin described Alfie's gesture as "amazing" and said when he accepted the donation, he promised Alfie it would get to those who needed it.

"He brought out of his bag this tin, I haven't counted it yet, but it is actually quite a lot of money in it and I said have you been collecting and he said 'no, it is my pocket money'," he said.

"It was absolutely amazing. It is just a little sign of the incredible outpouring of compassion there has been in London as a result of this.

"And in some ways, that is actually what we need, because we are now in a situation where we probably have enough clothing, food and so on, but cash, money, really does help.

"We have to make sure that money gets to the people who need it right now."

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