Republican party formally nominates Donald Trump for US president

Republican party formally nominates Donald Trump for US president

The Republican Party has formally nominated Donald Trump for president, completing the New York billionaire's rise from political outsider to major party candidate for the White House.

A day after a disruptive fight over the party's rules, there was little drama as delegates to the convention in Cleveland, Ohio, united behind the property mogul and reality TV star.

Mr Trump's campaign hoped the formal nomination would end the dissent surging through the Republican Party and overshadow the convention's chaotic start, including a plagiarism charge involving Melania Trump's address on opening night.

Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions opened the nominating process with a hearty endorsement of Mr Trump, declaring him "a warrior and a winner".

There were flurries of dissent on the convention floor as states that Mr Trump did not win recorded their votes, but he far outdistanced his primary rivals.

He was put over the top by his home state of New York.

Convention officials gave some delegates won by Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Ohio Governor John Kasich to Mr Trump, including all 19 from the District of Columbia. A delegate from the district accused the party of trying to quiet anti-Trump dissent.

This week's four-day convention is Mr Trump's highest-profile opportunity to convince voters that he is better suited for the presidency than Hillary Clinton, who will be officially nominated at next week's Democratic gathering.

But the rocky start raises fresh questions about his oversight of his campaign, which gives voters a window into how a candidate might handle the pressures of the presidency.

The plagiarism accusations centre on Monday night's speech by Mr Trump's wife. Two passages from her address - each 30 words or longer - matched a 2008 Democratic convention address by Michelle Obama nearly word-for-word.

Mr Trump's campaign managed only to keep the controversy alive on Day 2 of the convention by insisting there was no evidence of plagiarism, while offering no explanation for how the strikingly similar passages wound up in Mrs Trump's address.

The matter consumed news coverage from Cleveland, obscuring Mrs Trump's broader effort to show her husband's softer side.

Mrs Clinton pounced on the tumult, saying the Republican gathering had so far been "surreal," comparing it to the classic fantasy film Wizard Of Oz.

"When you pull back the curtain, it was just Donald Trump with nothing to offer to the American people," Mrs Clinton said during a speech in Las Vegas.

Top Trump adviser Paul Manafort said the matter had been "totally blown out of proportion".

He said: "They're not even sentences. They're literally phrases. I was impressed somebody did their homework to think that that could be possibly done."


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