Report: Suspect package at Glasgow University 'linked' to three London letter bombs

Report: Suspect package at Glasgow University 'linked' to three London letter bombs

Update: The suspicious package found at Glasgow University today looks to be linked to the three letter bombs sent to transport hubs in London yesterday, according to Sky News.

A controlled explosion has been carried out on the parcel discovered in the mailroom, triggering an evacuation.

A package sent to RBS headquarters in Edinburgh was found to pose no risk to the public.

Report: Suspect package at Glasgow University 'linked' to three London letter bombs

Earlier: Glasgow University buildings reopen after suspect package sparks evacuation

A number of buildings have been evacuated at Glasgow University in Scotland after reports of a suspicious package.

The parcel was received in the mail room.

A tweet from the university said it was acting under advice from Police Scotland.

Police there are dealing with the incident.

A Police Scotland statement said: "Around 10:50am, on Wednesday 6 March 2019, police received two reports of suspicious packages found at the University of Glasgow and the Royal Bank of Scotland in Edinburgh.

"Emergency services are in attendance and both buildings have been evacuated. At this stage there is nothing to link these incidents. The items will be examined and enquiries are ongoing."

The area surrounding the building has reopened and the public were thanked for their patience.

A controlled explosion was carried out on a suspicious package which was found in the mailroom at Glasgow University, Police Scotland said.

Several university buildings were evacuated and nearby roads closed after the discovery this morning.

Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson said: "Police Scotland officers are continuing inquiries after a suspicious package was received at the University of Glasgow today.

"The package was not opened and no-one was injured. The emergency services were alerted and several buildings within the estate were evacuated as a precaution. A controlled explosion of the device was carried out this afternoon by EOD (explosives ordnance disposal)."

A number of police cordons in and around University Avenue will be in place until further notice, he said.

Mr Johnson added: "There is no ongoing risk to the public. Police Scotland is liaising with the Metropolitan Police in relation to their investigation into packages received in London yesterday.

"However, it is too early to say whether there is a link."

A statement from Glasgow University said: "Police Scotland have advised the university that the incident relating to a suspicious package in the mailroom is now over.

"Minor restrictions will remain in place around the Isabella Elder building and Botany Gate while the mailroom will remain closed for now. All other buildings are being reopened."

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