Remember when the Airlander nosedived? It did so to avoid snagging a dangling mooring line

Remember when the Airlander 10 made an incredibly slow crash-landing at a funny angle?

Well an interim report submitted to the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) found that a mooring line had dropped free from the nose during the aircraft’s second take-off and so a “higher than desired” landing had to be made to avoid potentially snagging it on trees.

The world’s largest airship – which is also less flatteringly known as the Flying Bum (no explanation probably needed) and is the length of a football pitch – was damaged after nosediving at Cardington Airfield, Bedfordshire, on August 24.

The AAIB will continue to investigate but said that it was “very encouraged” by the capability of the aircraft demonstrated in its initial test flights – “despite the hard landing”.

Good to know for us lot since one of its possible functions for the future is passenger travel.

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