Raid saves thousands of birds in anti-cockfight crackdown

Raid saves thousands of birds in anti-cockfight crackdown

More than 3,000 birds were rescued in a cockfighting crackdown in New York this weekend that resulted in nine arrests.

In a statement last night, state attorney general Eric Schneiderman said it was the largest cockfighting swoop in New York state and among the largest in US history.

Raid saves thousands of birds in anti-cockfight crackdown

Operation Angry Birds simultaneously targeted locations in Queens, Brooklyn and Ulster County with assistance from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Ulster County Sheriff’s office, Mr Schneiderman said.

“Cockfighting is a cruel, abusive and barbaric practice that tortures animals, endangers the health and safety of the public and is known to facilitate other crimes,” Mr Schneiderman said.

At the cockfights, spectators were charged admission fees and an additional fee for a seat within the secret basement location that housed the all-night fights, authorities said. Spectators placed bets on the fights with individual wagers reaching 10,000 US dollars.

In Queens, authorities raided a cockfighting bi-monthly event where 70 people were taken into custody, including six arrested on felony prohibition of animal fighting charges. The ASPCA took control of 65 fighting birds, authorities said.

In Brooklyn, a pet shop was raided where 50 fighting birds were rescued from a basement. The pet shop’s owner was arrested on a felony charge and cockfighting contraband, including artificial spurs and syringes used to inject performance enhancing drugs, were also found.

Authorities also raided a 90-acre farm in Plattekill, rescuing as many at 3,000 birds. The farm’s owners charged rent to cockfighting enthusiasts from various other states.

In New York, cockfighting and possession of a fighting bird at a cockfighting location each carry a maximum penalty of four years in jail and a fine of up to 25,000 US dollars, according to the attorney general’s office.

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