President Trump offers help 'if we can' to terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard

President Donald Trump has said he would be "delighted" to help terminally-ill Charlie Gard after his parents lost a legal fight to take him to the United States for treatment.

The little boy has been at the centre of a lengthy legal struggle involving his parents, who wanted him to undergo a therapy trial in the US, and hospital specialists who said the treatment was experimental and would not help.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates are now spending the last days of their 10-month-old son's life with him, after being given more time before his life-support is turned off.

Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, is being cared for at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

The US president tweeted on Monday: "If we can help little #CharlieGard, as per our friends in the U.K. and the Pope, we would be delighted to do so."

It comes after Pope Francis called for Charlie's parents to be allowed to "accompany and treat their child until the end".

President Trump offers help 'if we can' to terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard

- PA

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