Police close German shopping centre after tip-off about imminent attack

Police ordered a shopping centre in western Germany not to open on Saturday after receiving credible tips of an imminent attack.

The mall and adjacent car park in the city of Essen stayed closed as about 100 officers - many armed with machine pistols and bullet-proof vests - positioned themselves around the complex to prevent anyone from entering.

Several officers scoured the interior to bring out early morning cleaning staff.

"As police, we are the security authority here and have decided to close the mall," police spokesman Christoph Wickhorst said, adding that they had been tipped off by other security agencies late on Friday.

He refused to give further details because of the ongoing investigation.

The shopping centre at Limbecker Platz square was closed for the entire day.

The mall is one of the biggest in Germany with more than 200 stores and attracts up to 60,000 people on a regular Saturday, according to its website.

In 2016, three people were injured in an attack on a Sikh temple in Essen by radicalised German-born Muslim teenagers.

Germany has been on edge following a series of attacks in public places over the past year.

AP

More in this Section

Feminist figurehead Steinem blasts Israeli PM over US congresswomen travel banFeminist figurehead Steinem blasts Israeli PM over US congresswomen travel ban

Gibraltar rejects US pressure to hold Iranian oil tankerGibraltar rejects US pressure to hold Iranian oil tanker

Migrants jump off rescue boat to try to reach Italian islandMigrants jump off rescue boat to try to reach Italian island

Box of snakes left outside vet’s surgery in UKBox of snakes left outside vet’s surgery in UK


Lifestyle

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

Take no risks, ‘do all the right things’, and you’ll lead a comfortable, but dull, existence. ‘Living dangerously’, on the other hand, yields ‘highs’ of excitement usually followed, alas, by pain andRichard Collins: Live fast and die young or last up to 500 years

More From The Irish Examiner