Pilot admits flying passenger jet while three times over alcohol limit

Pilot admits flying passenger jet while three times over alcohol limit

A UK pilot has admitted flying a passenger jet from Spain while three times over the alcohol limit.

Ian Jennings (aged 47) from Gale Moor Avenue, Gosport, Hampshire, was arrested at Norwich Airport last month after landing a commercial chartered plane with about 10 people on board.

Today at Norwich Magistrates’ Court he admitted flying while the alcohol in his breath was over the prescribed limit.

The offence carries a maximum sentence of two years in prison.

Prosecutor Lesla Small said: “The police had received information from a member of the public and attended Norwich Airport.

“The passengers were allowed to get off the aircraft and he was breathalysed.

“This offence is aggravated by the fact he had flown from Spain with passengers on board.”

Officers detected 31 microgrammes of alcohol per 100 militres of breath – the limit for pilots is 9 microgrammes while the limit for drivers is 35.

Marcus Crosskell, mitigating for Jennings, said: “He is a gentleman of unblemished character with a 20-year-plus career as a pilot.”

Magistrates said the case was so serious it would have to be sentenced by a crown court judge at a later date.

Jennings was released on bail on the condition he does not fly any aircraft.

His licence has been suspended by the Civil Aviation Authority.

The plane is believed to have been a Canadair CL601-3A Challenger.

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