'People are curious' says Church of Scientology leader as new TV channel launched

'People are curious' says Church of Scientology leader as new TV channel launched

The Church of Scientology has launched its own TV channel.

The channel was launched with a pledge that it will be candid about every aspect of the church and its operations but is not seeking to preach or convert.

"There's a lot of talk about us. And we get it," church leader David Miscavige said while introducing the first night of programming on Monday.

"People are curious. Well, we want to answer your questions. Because, frankly, whatever you have heard, if you haven't heard it from us, I can assure you we're not what you expect."

Founded in 1954 by science fiction writer L Ron Hubbard, the church teaches that technology can expand the mind and help solve problems. It has about 10 million members worldwide.

Scientology is an "expanding and dynamic religion and we're going to be showing you all of it", Mr Miscavige said from the "spiritual headquarters" in which he was standing - a Florida-based, corporate-looking building - its churches around the world and a behind-the-scenes look at its management.

The channel also will explore the life and philosophy of Hubbard, whom Mr Miscavige called "a true-to-life genius".

With all that the channel intends to present, he said: "Let's be clear: We're not here to preach to you, to convince you or to convert you. No. We simply want to show you."

Mr Miscavige did not directly address critics even though Scientology does not lack for them.

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