Parents of Alfie Evans still waiting for Supreme Court decision

Parents of Alfie Evans still waiting for Supreme Court decision

The parents of a 22-month-old boy who has been at the centre of a life support treatment battle are waiting to hear whether Supreme Court justices will analyse the case.

A High Court judge has ruled that doctors can stop treating Alfie Evans, against the wishes of his parents Kate James and Tom Evans, and three Court of Appeal judges have upheld that decision.

Alfie's parents, who come from Liverpool, now want to stage a fight at the Supreme Court in London.

The couple must first clear an initial legal hurdle and persuade Supreme Court justices that they have a case worth arguing.

A Supreme Court spokeswoman said justices have received a written application from lawyers representing Alfie's parents, and written submissions from lawyers representing doctors, but have yet to decide whether the case is worth arguing.

The spokeswoman said justices might make that decision after considering written arguments or may stage a hearing where the merits of the couple's case could be debated.

Judges have heard that Alfie, who was born on May 9 2016, is in a "semi-vegetative state" and has a degenerative neurological condition doctors had not definitively diagnosed.

Mr Justice Hayden had analysed the case at hearings in the Family Division of the High Court in London and Liverpool.

Specialists at Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool said life support treatment could stop and the judge said he accepted medical evidence which showed that further treatment was futile.

More in this Section

Corbyn demands immediate publication of UK Government’s no-deal dossierCorbyn demands immediate publication of UK Government’s no-deal dossier

Pentagon conducts first test of previously banned missilePentagon conducts first test of previously banned missile

Twitter shuts Chinese accounts targeting Hong Kong protestsTwitter shuts Chinese accounts targeting Hong Kong protests

US lawmakers 'could block trade deal' if Good Friday Agreement is underminedUS lawmakers 'could block trade deal' if Good Friday Agreement is undermined


Lifestyle

From Turkey to Vietnam, here’s where the chef and food writer has fallen in love with on her travellers.Sabrina Ghayour’s top 5 cities for foodies to visit

Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health (University College Cork graduate)Working Life: Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health

Like most Irish kids of our generation, chillies, spicy food, heat were never really big aspects of our formative eating experiences.Currabinny Cooks: Getting spicy in the kitchen

Timothy Grady is in Bantry this week to host a concert, and read from his classic book about the Irish in London, writes Don O'Mahony.Giving voice to the emigrant experience

More From The Irish Examiner