Novichok victim Charlie Rowley questions Russian ambassador over partner’s death

Novichok victim Charlie Rowley questions Russian ambassador over partner’s death

Novichok victim Charlie Rowley has said he “didn’t really get any answers” after meeting with Russia’s ambassador in London to question him about the death of his partner Dawn Sturgess.

Mr Rowley said he still believed Russia was responsible for the Salisbury attack and that he was fed “Russian propaganda” during the 90-minute discussion.

The 45-year-old was exposed to the same nerve agent used to attack ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia last March.

Mr Rowley and Ms Sturgess, 44, fell ill in Amesbury months later after coming into contact with a perfume bottle believed to have been used in the poisonings and then discarded. Ms Sturgess died in hospital in July.

Russian ambassador to the UK Alexander  Yakovenko (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)
Russian ambassador to the UK Alexander Yakovenko (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

Speaking to the Sunday Mirror, Mr Rowley said Alexander Yakovenko had seemed “genuinely concerned” about his situation when they met at the Russian embassy in Kensington, but had not changed his view on Russia’s involvement in the poisonings.

“I went along to ask them ‘Why did your country kill my girlfriend?’, but I didn’t really get any answers,” he said.

“I liked the ambassador, but I thought some of what he said trying to justify Russia not being responsible was ridiculous.

“I’m glad I met him and feel I did find out some things I didn’t know before. But I still think Russia carried out the attack.”

Mr Rowley, who says he continues to suffer from the long-term effects of exposure to Novichok, said he had asked the ambassador “more than a dozen questions in all”, including asking him about his claims that Britain was behind the attack.

A perfume bottle and applicator recovered by police from Novichok victim Charlie Rowley’s address in Amesbury (Metropolitan Police/PA)
A perfume bottle and applicator recovered by police from Novichok victim Charlie Rowley’s address in Amesbury (Metropolitan Police/PA)

He said Mr Yakovenko told him the substance used had not come from Russia and that the country only had small amounts of Novichok.

Speaking to the Sunday Mirror after the meeting, Mr Yakovenko said he and Mr Rowley were “on the same page” and wanted to see a report into the investigation published.

“It is important for Russia, but also for Charlie Rowley,” he said.

“I’ve seen a normal person who has really suffered a lot and who has suffered a tragedy in his life. If he asked for it, I would give him support.”

In September, Scotland Yard and the Crown Prosecution Service said there was sufficient evidence to charge two Russians – known by their aliases Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov – with offences including conspiracy to murder over the Salisbury nerve agent attack.

Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov (Metropolitan Police/PA)
Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov (Metropolitan Police/PA)

They are accused of being members of the Russian military intelligence service the GRU.

Russia has repeatedly denied any involvement, with president Vladimir Putin claiming the two suspects were civilians.

During an interview, the pair said they were tourists visiting Salisbury – particularly its famous cathedral.

- Press Association

More on this topic

Chemical weapons watchdog adds Novichok to banned listChemical weapons watchdog adds Novichok to banned list

Russia ‘thought they would get away with’ Salisbury attack, says Jeremy HuntRussia ‘thought they would get away with’ Salisbury attack, says Jeremy Hunt

Novichok poisoning: Intelligence services probed 'unusual' activity at Russian embassy in LondonNovichok poisoning: Intelligence services probed 'unusual' activity at Russian embassy in London

Salisbury to be declared decontaminated after Novichok poisoningSalisbury to be declared decontaminated after Novichok poisoning

More in this Section

Nobel laureate spars with journalists over views on ex-Yugoslavia’s civil warNobel laureate spars with journalists over views on ex-Yugoslavia’s civil war

Teenager pleads guilty to throwing boy off Tate Modern viewing platformTeenager pleads guilty to throwing boy off Tate Modern viewing platform

One person killed and gunman dead in shooting spree at US Naval Air StationOne person killed and gunman dead in shooting spree at US Naval Air Station

Greta Thunberg mobbed as she arrives in Madrid for climate change meetingGreta Thunberg mobbed as she arrives in Madrid for climate change meeting


Lifestyle

It’s not what you have that makes you happy, it’s what you do. And what better time to be proactive than during the season of goodwill, says Margaret Jennings.Joy to the world: Strategies to increase your happiness during the season of goodwill

For a magical mantelpiece makeover the natural way, foliage and garlands add showstopping sparkle to the scene, says Hannah Stephenson.Bring Christmas cheer indoors: Foliage and garlands add showstopping sparkle

More From The Irish Examiner