Newcastle’s Whey Aye will be Europe’s tallest observation wheel

Newcastle’s Whey Aye will be Europe’s tallest observation wheel

New images have been released of a huge observation wheel which developers want to build on the banks of the Tyne.

Dubbed the Whey Aye, the structure would become Europe’s tallest observation wheel at nearly 460ft (140m) – 16ft (5m) higher than the London Eye.

Artist’s impression of the huge observation wheel, dubbed the Whey Aye, and the Geordie Giant which developers want to build on the banks of the Tyne (World Wheel Company/PA)
Artist’s impression of the huge observation wheel, dubbed the Whey Aye, and the Geordie Giant which developers want to build on the banks of the Tyne (World Wheel Company/PA)

Those behind the project, which was first announced earlier this year, say it will see around £100 million invested in Newcastle and up to 550 jobs created.

New computer-generated images show elevations of the Whey Aye and the rest of the Giants On The Quayside development, including The Geordie Giant, a 39ft (12m) tall steel structure, and a new destination food and beverage experience for Newcastle called The Giant’s Quay.

Artist’s impression issued of the 460ft observation wheel, dubbed the Whey Aye (World Wheel Company/PA)
Artist’s impression issued of the 460ft observation wheel, dubbed the Whey Aye (World Wheel Company/PA)

It is proposed the development will feature a family entertainment centre with trampolines, climbing walls, a skywalk and separate cafe.

The Giant Sport Deck will comprise a multi-purpose play and sports complex, with covered five-a-side pitches and tennis courts available for public hire and a virtual golf club called The Quayside Golf Club.

A detailed planning application is due to be submitted to Newcastle City Council later this year.

Drawing illustrating the height of the planned observation wheel in Newcastle upon Tyne compared with other North East landmarks (World Wheel Company/PA)
Drawing illustrating the height of the planned observation wheel in Newcastle upon Tyne compared with other North East landmarks (World Wheel Company/PA)

Phil Lynagh, chief executive officer of World Wheel Company’s Newcastle operation, said: “It gives us great pleasure to reveal these images and further details of the development to give people a deeper understanding of our vision for the Whey Aye and the Giants On The Quayside development.

“We have had an overwhelmingly positive response to our plans so far and hope this latest announcement will whet people’s appetites even further.

“We are proposing a £100 million regeneration and inward investment project that will create local jobs and ongoing revenue for the regional economy.”

“Why aye” – or Whey Eye – is a Geordie phrase of meaning “Yes, of course”.

- Press Association

More in this Section

Youth just seconds from death in lethal rail prank in WalesYouth just seconds from death in lethal rail prank in Wales

Judge rejects legal challenge calling for Brexit deal to be ruled unlawfulJudge rejects legal challenge calling for Brexit deal to be ruled unlawful

Lebanese PM offers 72-hour ultimatum amid nationwide protestsLebanese PM offers 72-hour ultimatum amid nationwide protests

Extinction Rebellion climate protester scales Big Ben scaffoldingExtinction Rebellion climate protester scales Big Ben scaffolding


Lifestyle

Mountaintop monasteries, vicious-looking vultures, and a seriously impressive cable car.As Ryanair launches flights to Armenia, here’s why it deserves to be your next holiday destination

Jools Holland and his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra played a storming gig at Cork Opera House, writes Des O'Driscoll Live Music Review: Jools Holland and his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra

Concerns about people’s ability to access their own money have been growing – here’s what the debate is all about.Are we actually going to end up as a cashless society?

Esther N McCarthy mixes it up with spins on kitchen classics, Munster-based design news plus an absolute diamond of a poufMade in Munster: Wish list of the best products in the province

More From The Irish Examiner