New rules could restrict Mount Everest climbers

New rules could restrict Mount Everest climbers

Climbers hoping to tackle Mount Everest could in future be required to have already scaled tall peaks, undergone proper training, possess a certificate of good health and have insurance that would cover rescue costs if required.

A Nepalese government committee formed after a difficult mountaineering season on Everest has recommended a series of new rules for climbers.

Its report, published today, said people must have successfully climbed a peak higher than 21,320ft before they can apply for a permit to scale Mount Everest. Each climber would also be required to have a highly experienced guide.

Of the 11 people who died during the spring climbing season this year, nine were climbing from the southern side of the peak in Nepal, making it one of the worst years on the mountain.

The government was criticised for allowing too many climbers on the world’s highest peak.

Mountaineering authorities were also criticised for not stopping inexperienced climbers who had difficulty coping with harsh conditions on Everest and slowed down other climbers on the trail to the 29,035ft summit.

The spring climbing season began in March and ended in May.

The government is expected to amend its mountaineering regulations following the recommendations.

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