New fathers 'gain baby weight'

New fathers 'gain baby weight'

Fathers gain more than a stone after their child is born, according to new research which indicates that women are not the only ones struggling with “baby weight”.

The average man puts on 1.6 stone after becoming a father, figures from the UK suggest.

Pressures of work and family life have been blamed, as men do less exercise and eat more takeaways due to time constraints.

The study, commissioned by the UK's Benenden Healthcare Society and the Men’s Health Forum charity, examined the lifestyle habits of 2,000 fathers.

Dr Ian Banks, president of the Men’s Health Forum said: “Men can face an uphill struggle with their health when they become fathers.

“The survey shows even their kids know it. Heart disease is the biggest cause of premature death in men.

“We’re saying you only live once – if you want to be around to see your kids grow up you need to stay healthy.”

Benenden Healthcare Society spokesman Paul Keenan, external affairs manager at the health and wellbeing mutual, said: “The modern lifestyle is a hectic one and this study clearly shows the impact this is having on fatherhood.

“As we approach Father’s Day, we discover that the modern dad’s health is suffering under the strain from diverging pressures such as work and family life.

“As a result, dads are taking shortcuts with their diets – leading to increased weight, a more sedentary lifestyle and eventually running the risk of health scares.”

More in this Section

Hong Kong descends into chaos as protesters defy rally banHong Kong descends into chaos as protesters defy rally ban

Boeing says it regrets concerns over internal 737 Max messagesBoeing says it regrets concerns over internal 737 Max messages

Showdown for Johnson on crunch vote as Labour seeks to hijack Brexit legislationShowdown for Johnson on crunch vote as Labour seeks to hijack Brexit legislation

Australian newspapers campaign against government secrecyAustralian newspapers campaign against government secrecy


Lifestyle

John’s chairs will last a lifetime, but he is also passing on his knowledge to a new generation, writes Ellie O’Byrne.Made in Munster: The ancient art of súgán-making is woven into Irish family history

More From The Irish Examiner