Nato blamed for Afghan reporter's death

A group of Afghan journalists today blamed international troops for the death of a kidnapped colleague during a rescue operation.

In a statement issued today, the Media Club of Afghanistan also criticised Nato commandos for leaving his body behind while they rescued a New York Times writer.

They condemn the Taliban for abducting both men last week in northern Afghanistan.

Local journalists laid flowers at the grave of reporter and translator Sultan Munadi today in Kabul. He died in a Nato raid yesterday to free him and New York Times writer Stephen Farrell. Mr Munadi was caught in crossfire but Mr Farrell survived.

The reporters blamed international forces for launching a military operation without exhausting other channels.

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