Mouse found in loaf by father making sandwiches

Mouse found in loaf by father making sandwiches

A British man was sickened when he found a dead mouse in his loaf of bread while making sandwiches for his children.

The father-of-two thought the bread was just discoloured but on closer inspection saw the object was covered in fur.

Stephen Forse, from Kidlington, Oxfordshire, bought the Hovis Best of Both bread online from Tesco, through a store in Bicester, in January 2009.

Mr Forse said yesterday: “I noticed a dark coloured object embedded in the corner of three or four slices.

“Initially I thought it was where the dough had not mixed properly prior to baking. As I looked closer I saw that the object had fur on it.

Mr Forse continued to prepare some sandwiches for his children from another loaf of bread, checking each slice carefully.

He said: “I still felt quite shaken. As I was feeling ill I couldn’t face eating anything myself.”

The experience was only made worse when environmental health officers visited the family’s home to collect evidence and found the mouse was missing its tail.

Mr Forse said: “Her comments made me feel ill once again as there was no indication as to where the tail was.

“Had it fallen off prior to the bread being wrapped or had any of my family eaten it with another slice of bread on a previous day?”

Following an investigation by council health officers, Premier Foods was ordered to pay £16,821(€19,801) at Oxford Crown Court on Friday.

Premier Foods pleaded guilty to failing to ensure all stages of food production were protected against contamination and failing to maintain a robust pest management system at its British Bakeries site in Mitcham, south London.

Cherwell District Council technical officer Aileen Smith said: “Mice harbour disease, particularly salmonella which can result in severe diarrhoea, vomiting, fever and can be fatal to children, the elderly or those with a compromised immune system.”

A Premier Foods spokesman said: “We apologise profusely for the distress caused as a result of this isolated incident.”

More in this Section

Johnson insists voting Tory ‘only way’ to deliver Brexit despite Farage threatJohnson insists voting Tory ‘only way’ to deliver Brexit despite Farage threat

Two-million-year-old molar fossil links extinct giant ape to living orangutanTwo-million-year-old molar fossil links extinct giant ape to living orangutan

Phage therapy hope for alcoholic liver diseasePhage therapy hope for alcoholic liver disease

Jeremy Corbyn under fire for saying IS leader should have been put on trialJeremy Corbyn under fire for saying IS leader should have been put on trial


Lifestyle

Aileen Lee meets Christina Kenny - co-founder and design director of Lamb Design - to talk about her work and inspirations.Christina Kenny of Lamb Design: ‘I love bringing the outside in and inside out’

Tyrone designer Sharon Wauchob on her career and the worth of luxury fastion. By Paul McLachen.From Marc Jacobs to her own label, Tyrone designer Sharon Wauchob on her life in fashion

The recent sentencing of two teenage boys for the murder of Ana Kriégel has once again brought the issue of pornography into public discourse. The details of the case, which are finally coming into public knowledge, illuminate some very worrying trends that are pervasive in the modern adolescent world and as parents and indeed as a society we can no longer languish in complacency.Learning Points: Hardcore porn can pollute our children’s minds

If children are confident in interacting with others it takes away so much stress and social anxiety for them. Not too long ago, my daughter Joan and I were out with friends at a restaurant and we wanted extra water and a few other bits and Joan volunteered to go up and ask the waiter for them. My friend was really surprised at this and said that none of her children would willingly do that.Mum’s the word: We should look for chances to strengthen our kids’ social skills

More From The Irish Examiner