Mourners to pay respects to Wisconsin shooting victims

Thousands of mourners are expected to gather today to pay their final respects to the six worshippers gunned down by a white supremacist at their Sikh temple over the weekend in the central US state of Wisconsin.

A former army veteran, 40-year-old Wade Michael Page killed five men and a woman at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin shortly before Sunday services, and then shot himself in the head.

Federal investigators might never know for certain why Page chose to attack total strangers in a holy place.

US Attorney General Eric Holder will join mourners from around the world at today’s service, which will include prayers and hymns.

Mourners then plan to return to the temple and begin a traditional rite called “akhand path”, a ceremony that involves a series of priests reading their holy book aloud from cover to cover.

The process, which takes 48 hours, is intended to honour the memories of the six victims.

“We want to pay homage to the spirits who are still in there,” said Harpreet Singh, the nephew of one of the victims.

Other dignitaries expected to attend the funeral include Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and US Congressman Paul Ryan.

Those killed in the shooting included Satwant Singh Kaleka, 65, the temple president who was shot as he tried to fend off Page with a butter knife.

The other victims included:

:: Ranjit Singh, 49, and his 41-year-old brother, Sita Singh, two priests whose families were back in India and whose lives in America revolved around their faith;

:: Suveg Singh Khattra, 84, a former farmer in India who was a constant presence at the temple;

:: Prakash Singh, 39, a priest who was remembered as a fun-loving personality who enjoyed telling jokes;

:: Paramjit Kaur, 41 who worked 66 hours a week to provide for her family, but also found time to pray every day for at least an hour.

The FBI had roped off the temple for four days while agents conducted their investigation. They handed the keys back to Sikh leaders yesterday morning, and workers spent the entire day cleaning up, repairing bullet damage and repainting walls.

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