More than 200 dead following Sierra Leone mudslides

More than 200 bodies have been brought to a morgue in Sierra Leone's capital following heavy flooding and mudslides, officials said.

Sinneh Kamara, a coroner technician at the Connaught Hospital mortuary in Freetown, told the national broadcaster that the number of corpses brought in has overwhelmed the facility.

He told the Sierra Leone National Broadcasting Corp that bodies were on the floor of the morgue.

Mr Kamara also called on the health department to deploy more ambulances, saying his mortuary only has four.

Footage on television showed family members digging through mud in a desperate bid to free their loved ones.

Many of the impoverished areas of Sierra Leone's capital are close to sea level and have poor drainage systems, exacerbating flooding during the West African country's rainy season.

File photo of Freetown.
File photo of Freetown.

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