Military reinforcements on way to Kunduz

Military reinforcements on way to Kunduz

Military reinforcements have been sent to Kunduz, where government forces managed to fend off a major Taliban assault earlier this year.

In a multi-pronged assault that took military and intelligence agencies by surprise, the insurgents sent hundreds of fighters into Kunduz, where they seized government buildings and freed hundreds of prisoners.

Residents said the militants reached the main square 12 hours after launching their attack.

They said photographs of President Ashraf Ghani and other leaders were torn down and the white flag of the Taliban was raised. They said residents were streaming to the airport in an effort to flee.

The deputy spokesman for President Ashraf Ghani had earlier described the situation in Kunduz as “fluid”. Zafar Hashemi said the president was “in constant contact with the security and defence leadership to provide them with guidance”.

“Our first priority is the safety and security of residents,” he said.

The Taliban used social media to claim the “conquest” of Kunduz and reassure residents that the jobs of teachers, doctors and other civil employees, and their personal property, were safe.

General Murad Ali Murad, the Deputy Chief of Army Staff, said the attack involved a large number of Taliban drawn from across the north of the country and included foreign fighters. “Strategic areas, including the airport, are controlled by Afghan security forces,” he said.

“Reinforcements have already arrived and attacks on the insurgent positions will be launched soon,” he said.

Mr Sediqqi said the target of the Taliban assault was the city’s main prison and police headquarters.

“Security forces in Kunduz were prepared for an attack, but not one of this size, and not one that was coordinated in 10 different locations at the same time,” he said.

More in this Section

Boris Johnson to tell Merkel and Macron there must be new Brexit dealBoris Johnson to tell Merkel and Macron there must be new Brexit deal

Dozens feared dead or wounded after explosion at Kabul wedding hallDozens feared dead or wounded after explosion at Kabul wedding hall

Detectives given extra 36 hours to quiz suspects in death of police officerDetectives given extra 36 hours to quiz suspects in death of police officer

Teenager on murder charge after lawyer stabbed to death in UKTeenager on murder charge after lawyer stabbed to death in UK


Lifestyle

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

Take no risks, ‘do all the right things’, and you’ll lead a comfortable, but dull, existence. ‘Living dangerously’, on the other hand, yields ‘highs’ of excitement usually followed, alas, by pain andRichard Collins: Live fast and die young or last up to 500 years

More From The Irish Examiner