Michigan state official enters plea in Flint water contamination case

Michigan state official enters plea in Flint water contamination case

A former Michigan state official has pleaded no contest in an investigation into the lead-contaminated water crisis in Flint.

Epidemiologist Corinne Miller entered the plea to a count of neglect of duty. In exchange, prosecutors dropped felony misconduct and conspiracy charges.

A no contest plea is not an admission of guilt, but is treated that way for sentencing. Ms Miller's lawyer, Kristen Guinn, says she entered the plea because of potential civil actions.

Another past city official, former Utilities Administrator Mike Glasgow, pleaded no contest to neglect in May.

Flint, a financially struggling city of 100,000 people, switched from Detroit's water system to the Flint River to save money in 2014.

But tests later showed that the river water was improperly treated and coursed through ageing pipes and fixtures, releasing toxic lead.

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