Manchester Arena blast: What we know so far

Manchester Arena blast: What we know so far

  • An explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in the Manchester Arena last night has been called a terror attack by British Police.
  • The attack occurred at around 10.35pm last night.
  • 22 people have been killed and 59 have been injured in the incident.
  • It has been confirmed that there are children among the dead.
  • Police have said they believe a lone male attacker, who died in the blast, was carrying an improvised explosive device which he detonated.

Update 8am: 22 people have been killed and 59 have been injured in the blast

Children are among the dead

The attack was carried out by a lone male suicide bomber who detonated an improvised explosive device. He died at the arena

Police are investigating whether he acted alone or was part of a network

It is the worst terrorist attack in the UK since 56 people were killed in the 7/7 London bombings in 2005.

The explosion rocked the Manchester Arena at the conclusion of a performance by the American star Ariana Grande.

Manchester Arena said the explosion happened outside the venue, as people began streaming from the doors.

Greater Manchester Police said they were called to the venue at around 10.33pm and approach roads were closed.

They said the blast was "being treated as a terrorist incident".

More than 400 officers were deployed on the operation throughout Monday night.

Manchester Victoria station was evacuated and trains cancelled.

The victims are being treated at eight hospitals across Greater Manchester, Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said.

The Prime Minister condemned what was being treated as an "appalling terrorist attack" and said she would chair a meeting of the Government's emergency Cobra committee on Tuesday.

All national General Election campaigning was suspended after the explosion.

A controlled explosion was carried out by police at the Cathedral Gardens area near Manchester Arena shortly after 1.30am.

Police said the suspicious item at the centre of the controlled explosion was just abandoned clothing.

Earlier: Here is what we know so far about the terrorist attack at Manchester Arena.

19 people have died and 50 have been injured in the blast.

The explosion rocked the Manchester Arena at the conclusion of a performance by the American star Ariana Grande.

Manchester Arena said the explosion happened outside the venue, as people began streaming from the doors.

Greater Manchester Police said they were called to the venue at around 10.35pm and approach roads were closed.

They said the blast was "currently being treated as a terrorist incident".

Manchester Victoria station was evacuated and trains cancelled.

Manchester Arena blast: What we know so far

A "controlled explosion" was carried out by police at the Cathedral Gardens area near Manchester Arena shortly after 1.30am.

The Prime Minister condemned what was being treated as an "appalling terrorist attack" and said she would chair a meeting of the Government's emergency Cobra committee on Tuesday.

Police said the suspicious item at the centre of the controlled explosion was just abandoned clothing.

The victims are being treated at six hospitals across Greater Manchester, Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said.

Manchester Arena blast: What we know so far

Theresa May suspended her General Election campaign following the news, while Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron cancelled a campaign tour to Gibraltar.

If discovered to be carried out by terrorists, it would become the worst atrocity in the UK since 56 people were killed in the 7/7 London bombings in 2005.

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