Man accused over secret sex abuse chatrooms held in South Korea

Man accused over secret sex abuse chatrooms held in South Korea

A man accused of operating secret chatrooms where he posted sexually abusive videos of blackmailed women in return for cryptocurrency payments has been detained in South Korea.

The 24-year-old suspect Cho Ju-bin was arrested as part of an investigation into private chatrooms on the Telegram messaging app.

Officers said that users paid in cryptocurrency to view videos of a sexual nature that involved dozens of allegedly blackmailed women and girls.

The allegations have triggered intense public uproar and soul-searching over a culture that critics say is lenient about sexual violence and continuously fails the victims.

Thank you for stopping the life of a devil (I) couldn’t stop

This has prompted president Moon Jae-in to call for thorough investigation and stern punishment for operators of such chatrooms and their users.

Wearing a neck brace and handcuffed to his waist, the suspect, Cho was paraded before journalists at the Jongno Police Station in Seoul before officers drove him to the prosecutors’ office.

Police officers created a perimeter around the station’s gate to block off angry protesters, who waved signs that read “From chatroom to prison” and “Punish all users” and yelled “Give him the highest penalty!”

Cho was transferred to prosecutors’ office for further investigation in Seoul (Kim Hong-ji/AP)
Cho was transferred to prosecutors’ office for further investigation in Seoul (Kim Hong-ji/AP)

“Thank you for stopping the life of a devil (I) couldn’t stop,” Cho said to the waiting media.

Under the nickname “Doctor”, Cho allegedly operated one of the biggest chatrooms with around 10,000 users, and police are investigating whether he operated others.

He is suspected of using private information he secured from workers at local government offices to blackmail victims lured through fake job ads.

On Monday, Mr Moon called for a thorough investigation and denounced the alleged crimes as a “cruel act destroying a human’s life.”

More in this Section

Boris Johnson spends night in hospital as he battles coronavirusBoris Johnson spends night in hospital as he battles coronavirus

New York coronavirus deaths climb as Trump sees ‘light at end of tunnel’New York coronavirus deaths climb as Trump sees ‘light at end of tunnel’

Three deaths from cruise ship docked in MiamiThree deaths from cruise ship docked in Miami

How atomic bombs made it possible for scientists to carbon date whale sharksHow atomic bombs made it possible for scientists to carbon date whale sharks


Lifestyle

Easy and cost-effective ways you can spruce up your home. By Carol O’CallaghanStaying in is the new going out: Easy and cost-effective ways to spruce up your home

Need a funny, hopeful read? Hannah Stephenson rounds up the best.10 uplifting books to cheer you up on dark days

Esther N McCarthy put the call out to Irish crafters and grafters this week. Let's support our local makers, all of these are available onlineWish List: Supporting Irish crafters selling online

Shane Johnson takes a look (and listen) at two recent electronic full-lengths.Album reviews: Wajatta and Takeleave provide beats and pieces

More From The Irish Examiner