Man accused of fraudulently claiming to have lost family members in Grenfell Tower fire

Man accused of fraudulently claiming to have lost family members in Grenfell Tower fire

A man has been arrested on suspicion of fraudulently claiming to have lost family members in the Grenfell Tower disaster.

The 52-year-old man is thought to have attempted to gain money and housing by pretending loved ones had died in the blaze.

He allegedly came forward in the immediate aftermath of the fire and was assigned family liaison officers, claiming to have lost his wife and son in the fire.

He attempted to claim financial support stating he had lost all his property, Scotland Yard said.

Police started to investigate the man after inconsistencies in his story became apparent, and found he was living around 20 miles away in Bromley, south east London.

They also found that he does not have a wife or child.

Officers spoke to neighbours of the flat the man claimed to live in who said he did not live at the address.

Metropolitan Police Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack, said: "The distress and suffering caused to so many families and loved ones that night is harrowing.

"I have made it clear that we are not interested in investigating things such as sub-letting or immigration matters as I want their help and do not want there to be any hidden victims of this tragedy.

"However, we will robustly investigate any information about anyone who seeks to capitalise on the suffering of so many."

The man was arrested yesterday on suspicion of fraud and is in custody at a west London police station.

Relatives of the person who did live in the property have been told about the investigation.

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