LATEST: Residents say tensions are rising as evacuation of towers continues

LATEST: Residents say tensions are rising as evacuation of towers continues

UPDATE 12.35pm: Residents yet to be evacuated from four tower blocks have claimed they are being intimidated by security guards, and that tensions are rising, as the operation to clear the buildings continues.

Around 20 households are yet to vacate their homes, with tenant Mandy Ryan claiming a security guard tried to intimidate her as she took her dogs for a walk on Sunday.

Ms Ryan, who shares her 22nd-floor flat in Dorney with her son, said the whole experience of the evacuation so far was "disruptive" and said she has encountered problems.

"I was bullied this morning trying to leave the building, he (the security guard) stood in front of the door and guys surrounded him and he said 'we need to know who you are'," she told the Press Association.

She said she was told by the man, who she has not seen before, that she could not take her animals outside.

Sayed Meah, 34, who has lived in Burnham since he was born, said he is yet to leave his eighth-floor flat.

Mr Meah provides 24-hour care for his 78-year-old mother, who has had a stroke, with his wife.

He was offered accommodation late on Saturday night, but said he will not accept it until the care company, which helps them, agrees to working at the new location.

Describing the feeling amongst other residents refusing to leave, he said they are "fighting on", and telling each they will not be going until a legal notice is obtained or they are "dragged out by their fingernails".

The council has said it could take two to four weeks for the four blocks to be made safe.

Refurbishment of the Chalcots Estate was overseen by Rydon, the company involved in the refit of Grenfell Tower, according to the Rydon website.

LATEST: Residents say tensions are rising as evacuation of towers continues

UPDATE 9.50am: Residents remaining in four tower blocks evacuated over fire safety concerns in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster will be told they "must leave", Camden Council has said.

The ongoing effort to clear the Chalcots Estate in north London comes after the Government revealed all of the 34 high-rises that have so far submitted cladding samples have failed combustibility tests.

The buildings are located in 17 local authorities across the country, including Manchester, Plymouth, Portsmouth, and Camden, Barnet, Brent, and Hounslow, in London.

Communities Secretary Sajid Javid urged local authorities and housing associations to continue to submit samples "as a matter of urgency" amid a nationwide safety operation launched after at least 79 people died when fire ripped through Grenfell Tower in north Kensington on June 14.

Some 3,000 Chalcots residents face weeks in temporary accommodation after Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said the authority took the "extraordinary action" to clear 600 flats because "we are really clear that those four blocks are not safe".

London Fire Brigade inspecting officers identified concerns over the combination of external cladding, fire doors, gas pipes and insulation, she added.

But despite being urged to leave by officials, around 20 households had refused to vacate their homes, in Taplow, Burnham, Bray and Dorney blocks, by Saturday evening.

On Sunday, Ms Gould said: "This morning council staff will conduct further door knocking to ask those who remain to leave, and issue another letter reiterating to residents who are still remaining in the Taplow, Bray, Dorney and Burnham blocks, that they must leave.

"By remaining in the blocks these residents risk delaying the work that is required and that we are undertaking to make these homes safe.

"It is not safe to remain in these blocks and our residents' safety will continue to be the council's number one priority."

Nearly 200 offers of accommodation have been made to the displaced residents, most of which have been accepted, she added.

EARLIER: Some 34 high-rise buildings in 17 local authorities across the country have failed fire cladding safety tests after the Grenfell Tower disaster, the Government has said.

The announcement came as around 3,000 residents of the Chalcots Estate in Camden, north London, face weeks in temporary accommodation after four tower blocks were evacuated.

Communities Secretary Sajid Javid said testing of potentially combustible cladding "is running around the clock".

"So far the cladding from 34 high-rise buildings, in 17 local authority areas, has failed the combustibility test," he added.

Manchester, Camden, Plymouth, Hounslow, Portsmouth, Barnet and Brent were named by Mr Javid as having buildings that had failed tests.

He stressed "cladding itself is not dangerous" and that a failure in testing does not necessarily mean a building will be evacuated.

"The decision by Camden Council to evacuate four of the five towers on the Chalcots Estate was because the failed testing of the external cladding was compounded by multiple other fire safety failures which the fire inspection team found within the buildings," he said.

Mr Javid praised the "calm and stoicism" residents showed when asked to leave their homes at short notice on Friday, in what he called a "distressing experience".

Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said the authority took the "extraordinary action" to clear 600 flats because "we are really clear that those four blocks are not safe".

London Fire Brigade inspecting officers identified concerns over the combination of external cladding, fire doors, gas pipes and insulation, she added.

Despite being urged to leave by officials, around 20 households had refused to vacate their homes, in Taplow, Burnham, Bray and Dorney, by Saturday evening.

Ms Gould said: "There are various legal routes that Camden Council could explore to require people to leave their homes, however, we really don't want to do this."

The council said it could take two to four weeks for the four blocks to be made safe.

Mother-of-six Najmon Adam, who has lived in Bray for 12 years, said she would remain in her property until the council found accommodation in the borough for her family.

The 36-year-old, whose children are aged between five and 15, told the Press Association: "I have a little one who is sick, she has diabetes, she needs insulin, and I can't take her to the leisure centre.

"The schools are just here, I have to go to the school, get her packed lunch ready and take her the insulin.

"How am I going to do that if I am somewhere far?"

Ms Gould committed £100,000 of council funds to pay for food and essential items displaced residents may need, with the council having spent £500,000 on hotel rooms for residents.

Work had been due to begin on stripping cladding from buildings on the Chalcots Estate, but Camden Council ordered the "decant" of residents on Friday evening.

More than 100 people stayed in Swiss Cottage Leisure Centre overnight, while the council promised to reimburse those who had paid for their own hotels.

Refurbishment of the Chalcots Estate was overseen by Rydon, the company involved in the refit of Grenfell Tower, according to the Rydon website.

The site said the Chalcots project was a £66 million refurbishment which lasted 191 weeks.

The work included external thermal rain screen cladding on five towers, new aluminium thermally broken windows on five towers, and an overhaul of external roofs.

It added that 711 flats were modernised with new wiring, heating, kitchens and bathrooms.

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