Latest: PETA says intruders who stormed Crufts were there to protest 'twisted dog beauty pageant'

Latest: PETA says intruders who stormed Crufts were there to protest 'twisted dog beauty pageant'

Update - 1.20pm: Animal Rights organisation PETA has described Crufts as a "twisted beauty pageant for dogs".

The world-famous dog show ended in dramatic fashion last night when the live final was interrupted by two protesters which were wrestled to the ground.

PETA has claimed responsibility for the demonstration, calling for an end to "extreme breeding".

Its director Elisa Allen said: "We were there really to highlight what is a twisted dog beauty pageant.

"Crufts is a celebration of everything that's wrong with dog-breeding. It's an event that promotes and supports breeding dogs to look a certain way at the expense of their own health."

12.31pm: Irish Greyhound Board says dog welfare tops their concerns after intruders storm Crufts

The head of the Irish Greyhound Board says the welfare of the dogs is their number one concern.

It comes after the live final of Crufts was dramatically interrupted last night when two animal rights protesters stormed the awards ceremony.

PETA has claimed responsibility, saying their members were protesting against "extreme breeding".

Gerard Dollard says greyhounds in Ireland are looked after throughout their whole career and beyond.

He said: "There are measures in place to ensure that the welfare of the greyhound is looked after all the way through their career.

"There is a very active group involved in rehoming greyhounds after their racing career, so over the next five years we would certainly hope to further expand in the animal welfare area."

11.23am: Crufts to review security after intruders storm arena as winner announced on live television

Two intruders stormed the arena as the winner of the Crufts dog show in England was announced on live television.

A man, who was named by Crufts organisers as a protester from the animal rights group Peta, was wrestled to the ground in the middle of the show arena, the NEC in Birmingham.

A female intruder was also wrestled to the ground by security staff.

Owner Yvette Short, of Edinburgh, had proudly stepped up to the podium with her Best In Show winner - a two-and-a-half-year-old whippet bitch called Tease - when the commotion unfolded.

Latest: PETA says intruders who stormed Crufts were there to protest 'twisted dog beauty pageant'

Ms Short quickly grabbed Tease as several men ran down and cornered the protester in front of a startled live audience.

The crowd broke into applause as the intruder was taken away.

Crufts and the NEC Group said they would review security procedures as "a matter of urgency" as the scare had frightened the dogs and risked their safety.

A Crufts spokesman said: "It appears that protesters from Peta gained unauthorised access to the ring in the main arena at Crufts, and in doing so scared the dogs and put the safety of both dogs and people at risk in a hugely irresponsible way.

"Our main priority at the moment is the well-being of the dogs that were in the ring, who are looked after by their owners and show officials.

"The NEC Group have extensive security procedures in place at Crufts and we, along with the NEC Group, will be reviewing what happened as a matter of urgency."

Peta UK later tweeted a clip of the invasion and claimed activists were protesting against extreme breeding and carrying banners which said "Crufts: Canine Eugenics".

It said there were two intruders and named them as members of the Vegan Strike Group, which bills itself as fighters against animal abuse.

- Digital Desk and PA

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