LATEST: Baby Charlie's parents in furious exit from court after barrister's scan claim

Update 5.30pm: Charlie Gard's parents reacted furiously when a barrister representing Great Ormond Street Hospital broke the news that a report on a new scan on the terminally-ill baby made for "sad reading".

His mother, Connie Yates, burst into tears and his father, Chris Gard, yelled "evil" after Katie Gollop QC on Friday told a judge analysing the latest stage of a legal battle over treatment what doctors thought of fresh scan results.

Mr Justice Francis was analysing preliminary issues at a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London on Friday prior to scheduled trial on Monday.

Mr Gard and Ms Yates want the judge to rule their 11-month-old son, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, should be allowed to undergo a therapy trial overseen by a specialist in New York.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, where Charlie is being cared for, say the therapy is experimental and will not help.

They say life support treatment should stop.

Charlie Gard's father yelled "evil" after a lawyer representing Great Ormond Street Hospital broke the news that a report on a new scan on the terminally ill baby made for "sad reading".

The little boy's mother burst into tears as barrister Katie Gollop QC told a judge analysing the latest stage of a legal battle over Charlie's treatment what specialists thought of fresh scan results.

Connie Yates told Mr Justice Francis that she and Chris Gard had not yet seen the report.

The judge was analysing issues at a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London on Friday when news of the scan results emerged.

Earlier: Charlie Gard's parents have begun the latest stage of their legal fight over treatment for their terminally ill baby.

A judge is further analysing issues at a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates want Mr Justice Francis to rule that their 11-month-old son, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, should be allowed to undergo a therapy trial overseen by a specialist in New York.

Specialists at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, where Charlie is being cared for, have said the therapy is experimental and will not help.

They say life support treatment should stop.

Charlie's parents, who are in their 30s and come from Bedfont, west London, have already lost battles in the High Court, Court of Appeal and Supreme Court in London.

They have also failed to persuade European Court of Human Rights judges to intervene.

But the couple say there is new evidence and want Mr Justice Francis, who in April ruled in favour of Great Ormond Street and said Charlie should be allowed to die with dignity, to carry out a fresh analysis of their case.

Mr Justice Francis considered the couple's new claims at preliminary hearings.

Last week, he suggested that the American specialist - Michio Hirano, a professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Centre in New York - should travel to London to meet Great Ormond Street doctors and other clinicians.

Dr Hirano examined Charlie and discussed his case at Great Ormond Street on Monday and Tuesday.

Barrister Grant Armstrong, representing Charlie's parents, said Friday's hearing had been arranged so the judge could make case directions.

Mr Justice Francis is expected to analyse issues in more detail at another hearing on Monday.

Charlie's parents were in court.

Mr Armstrong said Charlie had undergone further scans in the last few days. He also said experts had discussed the case.

Mr Armstrong said Dr Hirano and Charlie's parents could give evidence at next week's hearing.

The judge said he would need to know what new material there is since he decided in April that life-support treatment should stop.

He said would also want to know what difference any new material would make.

Mr Armstrong said a range of opinions had been expressed at a medical experts' meeting earlier this week.

Mr Justice Francis said there had also been a "considerable amount of agreement".

He added that results from one scan were not yet available.

PA


More in this Section

Which European city hopes to plant three million new trees by 2030?

Almost 60% of Scots think independence better than no-deal Brexit – poll

Police looking to identify culprit who sparked Italy nightclub stampede

Boris Johnson: Irish border question should be dealt with in free-trade talks


Lifestyle

Personal trainers and nutritionists reveal their simple secrets to a healthier Christmas

Live the green dream and let plants take root in your home

Sleep tight, baby: A bed system you can use from birth to 10 years old

Wish List: Festive stocking choices for Christmas shoppers

More From The Irish Examiner