Knox battles to prove innocence

Amanda Knox spoke today of her battle to prove she did not kill her British flatmate Meredith Kercher.

The American student was found guilty along with Italian former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito in December of killing Miss Kercher but said she will “fight to prove” she is innocent.

She also revealed she exchanges letters with 26-year-old Sollecito, who is being held in a different prison.

Knox, 23, said: “We often write to each other, we give each other strength.

“We have ended up in a surreal affair that we still don’t understand but at least it unites us. The affection remains from the love we had.”

In an interview with Italian glossy magazine Oggi, Knox described her prison routine, saying she gets up at around 6am and practises yoga before replying to the 300 letters she receives each month from family, friends and supporters.

The University of Washington student often spends the afternoons studying and playing volleyball with other inmates.

She insisted she was not involved in Miss Kercher’s murder, adding: “I find it really hard to accept that my friend Meredith is dead, and I am accused of killing her. It’s really hard for me and, at times, the whole thing is much bigger than me.”

Miss Kercher, 21, from Coulsdon, Surrey, was found dead in her bedroom in Perugia on November 2, 2007 in the house she lived in with Knox and others on her year abroad in the Umbrian town.

Her throat had been slit and her semi-naked body was partially covered by a duvet.

Knox, from Seattle, was jailed for 26 years while Sollecito was sentenced to 25 years.

A third defendant, Rudy Hermann Guede, an immigrant from the Ivory Coast, was convicted of Miss Kercher’s murder in a separate trial. His 30-year prison sentence was later reduced to 16 years on appeal.

A claim by Mafia informant Luciano Aviello that he has evidence Miss Kercher was killed by his brother, Antonio, will form part of an appeal by Knox’s defence team.

She said: “When all my cellmates heard the news they hugged me and said: ’Now you will be freed’.

“I kept calm because the greatest danger is getting hopeful and of believing too much in freedom.”

More in this Section

Harry and Meghan to step back from royal duties and stop getting public fundsHarry and Meghan to step back from royal duties and stop getting public funds

Police fire tear gas at protesters in BeirutPolice fire tear gas at protesters in Beirut

Iran to send black box flight recorders from downed jet to UkraineIran to send black box flight recorders from downed jet to Ukraine

Harry Dunn: UK police chief demands urgent meeting with US base commanderHarry Dunn: UK police chief demands urgent meeting with US base commander


Lifestyle

The actor knows how to impress when it comes to high profile events.6 times Katie Holmes wowed on the red carpet

Glamour, fun and feathers all feature in this year’s hottest looks – but first and foremost, individual style rules.10 on-trend ways to transform your home in 2020

Abi Jackson shares the enduring appeal of Pooh Bear’s wisdom on Winnie-the-Pooh Day – author A.A. Milne’s birthday.Winnie-the-Pooh Day: The wellbeing lessons we can learn from Pooh Bear

We asked three experts for the low-down on shampooing frequency.How often should you really wash your hair?

More From The Irish Examiner