Johnson & Johnson ordered to pay woman $417m in talcum powder cancer claim case

Johnson & Johnson ordered to pay woman $417m in talcum powder cancer claim case

A US jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $417m to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that the talc in the company's baby powder causes ovarian cancer when applied regularly for feminine hygiene.

Los Angeles County Superior Court spokeswoman Liz Martinez confirmed the verdict.

California resident Eva Echeverria alleged the company failed to adequately warn consumers about the potential talcum powder cancer risks.

Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman Carol Goodrich said in a statement the company will appeal against the jury's decision.

A jury in St Louis, Missouri, ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $110.5m to a woman who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2012 and had used talcum powder.

The company has lost several other cases.

More in this Section

It’s appropriate to be scared about climate change pace – senior scientistIt’s appropriate to be scared about climate change pace – senior scientist

US ‘locked and loaded’ to respond to attack on Saudis, Trump saysUS ‘locked and loaded’ to respond to attack on Saudis, Trump says

Hong Kong officials decry violence after protesters attack government officesHong Kong officials decry violence after protesters attack government offices

David Cameron phoned European and US leaders to apologise over BrexitDavid Cameron phoned European and US leaders to apologise over Brexit


Lifestyle

I’m giggling but also it is tinged with tension. I peep out from behind the large sycamore. They are three trees away.Opening Lines: I’m just a bearded wheezing giggly man on the ground

I did my Leaving Cert in June and have just started college this week, so my school experience is extremely fresh in my memory. I went to Davis College in Mallow and it was a fantastic experience. I was the loud obnoxious child at the back of the classroom from day one. I had to (and still do, by the way) have an opinion on everything.Stand up and be counted : The Young Offender's Demi Isaac Oviawe on college and school life

When I was in secondary school I started working part-time as a waitress and I suppose I caught the hospitality bug back then.You've been served: General manager at Inchydoney Island Lodge & Spa Caitriona O’Keeffe

That an American study has found straight women prefer dad bods (“an untoned and slightly plump male physique, especially one that is considered attractive”) to six packs and hard shiny abs comes as no great surprise.Outside the Box: Tone down guys, us girls don’t mind moobs

More From The Irish Examiner