Johnson: I would rather be 'dead in a ditch' than ask for Brexit delay

Johnson: I would rather be 'dead in a ditch' than ask for Brexit delay

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than go to Brussels to ask for a further delay to Brexit.

At a West Yorkshire Police site this afternoon, Mr Johnson was asked if he could make a promise to the public not to return to Brussels to ask for a further Brexit delay, the PM said: “Yes, I can.

“I would rather be dead in a ditch.”

But he declined to give a direct answer when asked if he would resign before requesting that delay.

Instead, he said: “It costs a billion pounds a month, it achieves absolutely nothing.

What on Earth is the point of further delay? I think it’s totally, totally pointless.

Mr Johnson said he would "do everything that I possibly can to make sure that this country comes out of the EU on October 31".

"But unfortunately Parliament voted yesterday effectively to scupper our negotiating power and to make it much more difficult for this Government to get a deal.

"So what I want to do now is to really give the country a choice: we either go forward with our plan to get a deal, take the country out on October 31 which we can or else somebody else should be allowed to see if they can keep us in beyond October 31."

Mr Johnson said he hates "banging on" about Brexit but "frankly" cannot see any other way forward than a general election.

"I hate banging on about Brexit. I don't want to go about this any more," he said.

"I don't want an election at all, but frankly I cannot see any other way.

"The only way to get this thing done, to get this thing moving, is to make that decision.

"Do you want this Government to take us out on October 31 or do you want Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party to go to that crucial summit in Brussels on October 17, effectively hand over control to the EU and keep us in beyond October 31?

"I think it's a no-brainer and I'm sorry to bring this painful subject up this afternoon but that's the reality of what we face and for me there can only be one way forward for our country."

Responding to the shock resignation of his brother Jo Johnson this morning, the British Prime Minister said his brother was a "fantastic guy" and a "brilliant minister".

Acknowledging they did not agree on Europe he added: "What Jo would agree is that we need to get on and sort this thing out."

Mr Johnson said his brother Jo "does not agree with me about the European Union because it's an issue that obviously divides families and divides everybody".

“I thank Jo (Johnson) for all the work that he has done and for the support he has given for our domestic agenda.”

One police officer standing behind Mr Johnson appeared to feel unwell and the Prime Minister, prompted by the audience in front of him, turned and asked her “are you alright?”

As the officer then took a seat with her head bowed, he said: “I’m so sorry, OK that is a signal for me actively to wind up.”

He then continued to criticise Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for not backing his plans for a snap general election.

The officer then stood up minutes later as Mr Johnson finished his speech.

Shadow home secretary Diane Abbott criticised Mr Johnson over the incident.

She tweeted: “Johnson kept these trainees waiting on their feet, and unsurprisingly, one of them appears to have felt faint.

“He saw that happen, and he ignored it. Tells you everything you need to know about this man – and how much he really cares about the police service.”

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