Japanese deputy PM retracts remark appearing to praise Hitler

Japanese deputy PM retracts remark appearing to praise Hitler

Japan's deputy prime minister has retracted a comment that seemed to praise the motives of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

Taro Aso was speaking at a seminar for his faction in the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Tuesday when he said: "I don't question a politician's motives; it is delivering results that matter. Hitler, who killed millions of people, was no good, even if his intentions had been good."

Mr Aso said that remark was "inappropriate" and he would like to retract it and regretted having caused a misunderstanding.

He said he meant that Hitler was a bad leader with bad intentions.

The Simon Wiesenthal Centre, a US-based Jewish human rights organisation, denounced the comment as "downright dangerous".

An official at the centre, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, said: "When will the elite of Japan wake up and acknowledge that they have a 'Nazi Problem'?"

Mr Aso is also the finance minister in Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Cabinet, and served as Japan's prime minister in 2008-9.

Japan's chief cabinet secretary, Yoshihide Suga, said after Mr Aso retracted his statement that the deputy prime minister "should make his own explanation when the time comes".

Mr Aso in 2008 was criticised for comparing the tactics of the Democratic Party of Japan to those of Nazis in 1930s Germany.

And in 2013 he withdrew a comment that seemed to suggest Japanese leaders should follow Nazi Germany's example in changing the constitution.

AP

More in this Section

Johnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UNJohnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UN

Labour faces Brexit policy battle at party conferenceLabour faces Brexit policy battle at party conference

Global youth protests urge climate actionGlobal youth protests urge climate action

Epstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claimsEpstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claims


Lifestyle

Against popular wisdom and flying a plane made from bamboo, wire and bike handlebars, a Co Antrim woman blazed a sky trail for aviation and for the independence of women, writes Bette BrowneMagnificent Lilian Bland blazed a trail for independence of women in her plane of bamboo

The epic battle for the bridge at Arnhem, as depicted in the blockbuster 'A Bridge Too Far', saw the Allies aim to end the war by Christmas 1944, but failed as a huge airborne assault force failed to take the last bridge across the Rhine. In an extract from his latest book 'A Bloody Week', Dan Harvey tells the story of one of the hundreds of brave men from Ireland who gave their all to the Allied campaignThe bridge to war: Dan Harvey's new book looks at the Irish who went a bridge too far

More From The Irish Examiner