Jail term for Texas teen who used 'affluenza' defence in fatal drink-driving case

Jail term for Texas teen who used 'affluenza' defence in fatal drink-driving case

The Texas teenager who used an "affluenza" defence in a fatal drunken-driving crash has been ordered to spend nearly two years in jail.

State District Judge Wayne Salvant said that Ethan Couch must spend 180 days in jail for each of the four people he killed in 2013 when he rammed a pick-up truck into a crowd of people helping a motorist.

The sentences will be served consecutively.

Couch was 16 and his blood-alcohol level was three times above the legal limit for adult drivers when the crash occurred.

Couch and his mother were caught in Mexico after fleeing a possible probation violation.

He has been has been in custody in Texas since January.

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