Italian woman who was Europe’s oldest person dies aged 116

Italian woman who was Europe’s oldest person dies aged 116

A 116-year-old Italian woman who authorities say was the oldest person in Europe and the second oldest in the world has died.

Italian news agency ANSA said Giuseppina Robucci died on Tuesday in the southern Italian town of Poggio Imperiale, where she was born on March 20 1903.

She lived 116 years and 90 days.

Robert Young, of the US-based Gerontology Research Group, said Ms Robucci was the last European born in 1903.

She was just two months younger than the current oldest living person, Kane Tanaka of Japan, who was born on January 2 1903.

Ms Robucci is number 17 on the list of people who lived the longest lives.

Known locally as Nonna Peppa, Ms Robucci had five children, nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

ANSA said she ran a coffee bar with her husband for years.

- Press Association

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