Istanbul's shores turn turquoise thanks to micro-organism bloom

The waters around Istanbul have turned a striking shade of turquoise.

A natural phenomenon called a "phytoplankton bloom" has turned the normally dark waters of the Bosphorus and Golden Horn into an opaque tone of light blue.

Istanbul's shores turn turquoise thanks to micro-organism bloom

This is caused by microscopic organisms that have inundated the Black Sea, just north of Turkey's largest city.

Berat Haznedaroglu, an environmental engineer, said this is a normal annual event.

He said: "This year we got a lot of rain events that carried nutrients from the Saharan desert to the Black Sea, which created an optimal environment for this phytoplankton to bloom."

Mr Haznedaroglu works at the Institute of Environmental Sciences at Istanbul's public Bogazici University.

The Bosphorus, a strait that separates Europe from Asia, also connects the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara.

AP

More in this Section

Johnson to address new Tory MPs as they prepare to vote on Brexit dealJohnson to address new Tory MPs as they prepare to vote on Brexit deal

British tourist, 50, shot dead in robbery outside Buenos Aires hotelBritish tourist, 50, shot dead in robbery outside Buenos Aires hotel

Violence flares in New Delhi over Indian citizenship lawViolence flares in New Delhi over Indian citizenship law

Greta Thunberg stuck on floor of crowded German train after climate summitGreta Thunberg stuck on floor of crowded German train after climate summit


Lifestyle

We hear a lot about the geese, ducks and swans that arrive here from colder climes for the winter, but much less about smaller birds that come here to escape harsher conditions in northern Europe.Keep an eye out for redwings this winter

More From The Irish Examiner