Helen Bailey murder trial jury starts deliberations

Helen Bailey murder trial jury starts deliberations
Helen Bailey.

The jury has started deliberations in the trial of Helen Bailey's fiance, who is accused of murdering the children's author and dumping her body in a cesspit.

Ian Stewart, 56, allegedly drugged and smothered Ms Bailey in a plot to get his hands on her £3.3 million fortune in April last year.

The Electra Brown writer, 51, was found submerged in human sewage alongside her faithful companion, Boris the dog, three months after she vanished.

Stewart, of Baldock Road, Royston, Hertfordshire, is charged with murder, preventing a lawful burial, fraud and three counts of perverting the course of justice.

The jury was sent out to consider verdicts on Tuesday after a six-week trial at St Albans Crown Court.

After around four hours of deliberation, jurors were sent home for the day by Judge Andrew Bright.

They will continue considering their verdicts on Wednesday morning.

PA

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