Gold rains down on Russian airport after plane takes off

Gold rains down on Russian airport after plane takes off

The hatch of a cargo plane carrying precious metals accidentally flew open upon take-off in Russia - scattering at least 3 tons of gold on the runway.

An investigation is under way after the incident on Thursday at the airport in the far east city of Yakutsk, according to the Tass news agency.

An An-12 plane operated by the airline Nimbus took off for Krasnoyarsk carrying 9.3 tons of gold and other precious metals, according to the state Investigative Committee quoted by Tass.

Damage to a door handle caused it to fly open and spill some of the gold.

Authorities recovered 172 gold bars weighing 3.4 tons, Tass quoted Interior Ministry officials as saying.

No-one was hurt in the incident. Images circulating on social media showed gold bars scattered across a runway.

- Press Association and Digital Desk

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