French court rules dating site can keep promoting cheating

A French court has thrown out a complaint by a federation of Catholic families that dating site Gleeden's business model is illegal and anti-social because it encourages extra-marital affairs.

A Paris civil court ruled that promoting infidelity in ads is not unlawful because adultery is not a criminal offence in France and because cheating on one's spouse is not necessarily a civil violation.

The Catholic association had asked the court to ban Gleeden from referring to extra-marital relations in its communications.

Gleeden had pleaded for freedom of speech and argued that only spouses are entitled to invoke the obligation of fidelity.

AP


More in this Section

World needs to reduce red meat and sugar consumption by half to safeguard planet

‘Managerialism’ damaging teachers’ mental health – study

Labour warns Theresa May to rule out no-deal if she wants Brexit talks

‘Planetary health diet’ could avert premature deaths and safeguard the Earth


Lifestyle

Read an excerpt of 'My Coney Island Baby' below

Bernard O'Shea on hitting the road with old pal Karl Spain

Learning Points: My wife is having a baby and I’m stressed at work

Your guide to luxury - but affordable - spa experiences

More From The Irish Examiner