French court backs law against cockfighting

French court backs law against cockfighting

France’s top court has ruled that a law aimed at ending cockfighting is constitutional, rejecting an appeal by supporters of the tradition.

The Constitutional Council confirmed the ban on the creation of new cockfighting rings – called cockpits.

The law, dating back to 1964, aims to gradually get rid of all cockpits and, therefore, cockfighting.

It was recently challenged by two French citizens who wanted to open a new ring in the French island of Reunion.

Cockfighting is legal only in regions where it is considered a deeply-rooted tradition, especially in northern France and the French territories Reunion, French Guyana and French Antilles.

Otherwise, it is considered animal cruelty and is punishable by up to two years’ imprisonment and a fine of €30,000.

The practice consists of two roosters fighting against each other and often ends in the death of one of the combatants.

Cockfighting fans argue that the law is unfair, drawing a parallel to bullfighting.

Bullfighting is legal in south-western France, where the tradition is still gathering huge crowds, and the construction of new arenas to practice it is not banned.

Both practices are sharply criticised by animal protection movements.

In its decision, the Constitutional Council said that cockfighting and bullfighting are “different situations”.

Cockfighting is a common practice in south-east Asia and parts of Latin America, but is illegal in most western countries.

More in this Section

UK papers: Police ignored 30 years of child abuse cases over fears of 'racial tensions'UK papers: Police ignored 30 years of child abuse cases over fears of 'racial tensions'

China reports four more cases in viral pneumonia outbreakChina reports four more cases in viral pneumonia outbreak

Countdown clock to be projected onto Number 10 to mark Brexit dayCountdown clock to be projected onto Number 10 to mark Brexit day

Blizzard prompts state of emergency in Newfoundland capitalBlizzard prompts state of emergency in Newfoundland capital


Lifestyle

Bryan Stevenson is the American civil rights lawyer who provided the inspiration for the newly-released film Just Mercy. Esther McCarthy spoke to him in IrelandReal-life lawyer Bryan Stevenson on inspiring Just Mercy

So I’ve booked my holidays. And before you ask, yes, I’m basing it around food and wine. I’ll report back in July, but I thought readers might be interested in my plan should you be thinking about a similar holiday.Wines to pick up on a trip to France

Esther N McCarthy is on a roll for the new year with sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes.Wish List: Sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes

They have absolutely nothing really to do with Jerusalem or indeed with any type of artichoke, so what exactly are these curious little tubers?Currabinny Cooks: Exploring the versatility of Jerusalem artichokes

More From The Irish Examiner