France raises 'terror tax' to support attack victims

France raises 'terror tax' to support attack victims
Floral tributes laid after the Bataclan massacre. Picture: AP

French citizens will contribute an extra €1.60 on their property insurance policies to help finance a fund for victims of extremist attacks which have recently hit the country.

The measure comes into force on Sunday and requires policy holders to contribute €5.90 instead of €4.30.

French government officials said in October when they revealed the scheme that about 90 million insurance policies are floating the fund, which currently has reserves of €1.45bn.

More than 200 people have died in France as a result of terror attacks over the last 20 months.

The Bastille Day truck attack in Nice which left 86 dead this summer cost between €300m and €400m, approximatively the same as the November 13 attacks in Paris, which killed 130 people.

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