Former BBC Radio DJ admits committing sexual offences at teenage disco

Disgraced Radio 1 DJ Chris Denning has pleaded guilty to 21 historical child sex offences as part of a police investigation into a youth disco.

The prolific paedophile, 75, admitted abusing 11 children, some as young as eight, between 1969 and 1986.

He pleaded guilty at Southwark Crown Court in London to 21 sexual offences, including indecent assault of men and boys and inciting boys under 16 and 14 to commit acts of gross indecency.

He denied another three counts of indecent assault.

The offences relate to an investigation by Surrey Police, named Operation Ravine, into alleged sexual offences connected to the Walton Hop Disco, a teenage disco which ran from 1958 until 2001.

Denning, one of the founding presenters on the flagship station, appeared in the dock today wearing a faded red T-shirt and tracksuit bottoms.

He donned a pair of glasses and followed a written copy of the charges as they were read to him in full.

He will be sentenced at the same court on October 6 by Judge Alistair McCreath.

Denning, from London, has a string of previous convictions for abusing young boys.

He is currently serving a 13-year jail sentence for a catalogue of sexual assaults against 24 victims, including one allegedly at Jimmy Savile's house, from the 1960s to 1980s.

Judge Peter Testar said: "Judge McCreath sentenced this defendant in November 2014.

"It must make sense, Judge McCreath having passed that sentence, for him to sentence this man for these offences because the question which must arise is the relationship between any sentence passed today and any sentence passed then."

The three charges he pleaded not guilty to were ordered to lie on the file.

Prosecutor Jonathan Polnay said: "He has a very long record of offences against young boys.

"Given the very long indictment he has pleaded guilty to, we take the view that these counts would not make a difference to sentence."

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