Former Australian PM accepts UN position

Former Australian PM accepts UN position

Australia’s dumped prime minister accepted a part-time UN job in a development that the opposition leader argues is a reason why the governing party should not be re-elected this month.

The United Nations announced that Kevin Rudd, who was replaced by Prime Minister Julia Gillard in an internal Labour Party revolt in June, was appointed to a 21-member panel on global sustainability.

Ms Gillard promised Mr Rudd a senior ministry in her government if Labour wins a second three-year term in elections next week.

But opposition leader Tony Abbott said today that Mr Rudd’s part-time job meant that Ms Gillard’s Cabinet was in “complete flux”, with two senior ministers quitting at the August 21 poll.

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