Ex-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn charged with breach of trust

Ex-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn charged with breach of trust

Prosecutors have charged Nissan’s former chairman Carlos Ghosn with breach of trust, Japanese media have reported.

The charges reportedly filed on Monday are his fourth and are related to payments by a subsidiary of the Japanese car maker that allegedly went to a private investment company controlled by Ghosn.

The charges could not immediately be confirmed with prosecutors, but the indictment was expected and it ensures he will remain in detention at least for now. His current period of detention would have expired on Monday if he had not been charged.

Carlos Ghosn speaks in a video during a press conference held by his lawyers in Tokyo earlier this month (Koji Sasahara/AP)
Carlos Ghosn speaks in a video during a press conference held by his lawyers in Tokyo earlier this month (Koji Sasahara/AP)

Ghosn, 65, was arrested in November. He says he is innocent of all financial misconduct charges against him.

Prosecutors re-arrested Ghosn in early April, a month after he was released on 1 billion yen (£6.9 million) bail pending his trial.

He is being held at the Tokyo Detention Centre for questioning about the latest set of charges against him. His lawyers have said they will again seek his release on bail.

Prosecutors allege that £1.9 million out of £3.8 million paid by Nissan to one of its overseas distributorships went to Ghosn’s investment company for his private use.

Japanese media have reported that the funds allegedly were used to pay for a yacht, among other things.

Ghosn contends that the compensation he allegedly under-reported was never decided upon or paid, and that payments that prosecutors say amount to breach of trust were legitimate business transactions.

Carlos Ghosn’s lawyer, Junichiro Hironaka (Koji Sasahara/AP)
Carlos Ghosn’s lawyer, Junichiro Hironaka (Koji Sasahara/AP)

Re-arrests of a suspect released on bail, which is allowed only after indictment, are unusual.

The handling of Ghosn’s case has triggered criticism of Japan’s criminal justice system, where lengthy detentions of suspects during investigations are routine.

Nissan’s French alliance partner, Renault, sent Ghosn, a citizen of Brazil, France and Lebanon, to the Japanese car giant to turn it around when it was on the brink of bankruptcy 20 years ago. Nissan is 43% owned by Renault, which is partly owned by the French government.

In a video statement released this month after Ghosn’s arrest, the former star executive accused some other Nissan executives of plotting against him out of fear that Renault would take over the Japanese car maker.

- Press Association

More in this Section

It’s appropriate to be scared about climate change pace – senior scientistIt’s appropriate to be scared about climate change pace – senior scientist

US ‘locked and loaded’ to respond to attack on Saudis, Trump saysUS ‘locked and loaded’ to respond to attack on Saudis, Trump says

Hong Kong officials decry violence after protesters attack government officesHong Kong officials decry violence after protesters attack government offices

David Cameron phoned European and US leaders to apologise over BrexitDavid Cameron phoned European and US leaders to apologise over Brexit


Lifestyle

I’m giggling but also it is tinged with tension. I peep out from behind the large sycamore. They are three trees away.Opening Lines: I’m just a bearded wheezing giggly man on the ground

I did my Leaving Cert in June and have just started college this week, so my school experience is extremely fresh in my memory. I went to Davis College in Mallow and it was a fantastic experience. I was the loud obnoxious child at the back of the classroom from day one. I had to (and still do, by the way) have an opinion on everything.Stand up and be counted : The Young Offender's Demi Isaac Oviawe on college and school life

When I was in secondary school I started working part-time as a waitress and I suppose I caught the hospitality bug back then.You've been served: General manager at Inchydoney Island Lodge & Spa Caitriona O’Keeffe

That an American study has found straight women prefer dad bods (“an untoned and slightly plump male physique, especially one that is considered attractive”) to six packs and hard shiny abs comes as no great surprise.Outside the Box: Tone down guys, us girls don’t mind moobs

More From The Irish Examiner