EU to adopt more sanctions against Russia

EU to adopt more sanctions against Russia
Vladimir Putin

The European Union is adopting tough new economic sanctions against Russia over its support of rebels fighting in eastern Ukraine, diplomats have said.

The diplomats said the measures approved include an arms embargo, a ban on the sale of dual use and sensitive technologies, and a ban on the sale of bonds and equities by state-owned Russian banks in European capital markets.

The measures were decided at a meeting of EU ambassadors.

Another EU official said the ambassadors also added eight names to the list of people subject to EU-wide asset freezes and travel bans, including four people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

They also put three more entities on the list of companies and organisations subject to EU sanctions because of their alleged actions against Ukraine's sovereignty or territorial integrity, the official said.

The move came amid frustration at the apparent ineffectiveness of previous sanctions and outrage at the deaths of 298 people aboard the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over eastern Ukraine.

Europe, which has a much bigger trade relationship with Russia than the US, had lagged behind Washington in its earlier punitive measures, in part out of concern from leaders that the penalties could hurt their own economies.

But on Monday, in a rare video conference call with President Barack Obama, the leaders of Britain, Germany, Italy and France expressed their willingness to adopt new sanctions against Russia in co-ordination with the United States, an official French statement said.

A spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron said it was agreed the EU should adopt a “strong package of sectoral sanctions as swiftly as possible.”

Until now, the trade bloc has only targeted specific individuals, businesses or rebel groups.

The Western nations are demanding Russia halt the alleged supply of arms to Ukrainian separatists and other actions that destabilise the situation in eastern Ukraine.

More on this topic

Ousted ambassador tells impeachment hearing her removal helped ‘shady interests’Ousted ambassador tells impeachment hearing her removal helped ‘shady interests’

White House: Ukraine aid held up amid Trump push for investigation of DemocratsWhite House: Ukraine aid held up amid Trump push for investigation of Democrats

Far right marchers vent anger at Ukraine’s president over peace planFar right marchers vent anger at Ukraine’s president over peace plan

Ukraine to investigate claims of interference in 2016 US electionUkraine to investigate claims of interference in 2016 US election

More in this Section

Tokyo Olympics preparations continue despite coronavirus fearsTokyo Olympics preparations continue despite coronavirus fears

Spanish PM opens talks with Catalonian leaders on separatist movementSpanish PM opens talks with Catalonian leaders on separatist movement

Coronavirus: Facebook banning ads that 'guarantee a cure or prevention'Coronavirus: Facebook banning ads that 'guarantee a cure or prevention'

Egypt bids farewell to former president Hosni Mubarak with full-honours funeralEgypt bids farewell to former president Hosni Mubarak with full-honours funeral


Lifestyle

I don't remember a lot of shouting in my household growing up, and neither does my twin.Mum's the Word: How did my parents manage to create a calm household?

The TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Awards have been revealed. These are the destinations that came out tops.3 emerging destinations to add to your travel wish list – according to TripAdvisor data

The recent death of Caroline Flack has once again brought the issue of internet trolls and cancel culture back into public discourse.Learning Points: The reality is we all play a role in cancel culture

Rita de Brún speaks with Sean McKeown, Fota Wildlife Park director and longtime Cork resident.‘You’ve got to make the changes you want to see’, says Fota Wildlife director

More From The Irish Examiner