EU gas emissions rose in 2010

EU gas emissions rose in 2010

The European Union’s greenhouse gas emissions rose in 2010 for the first time in six years, but is still on track to meet its target under an international climate accord, the EU’s environmental agency said today.

Emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases increased by 2.4% as some EU countries bounced back from recession, the European Environment Agency said.

In addition, a colder winter than the previous year led to higher heating demand, the EEA added.

EEA Executive Director Jacqueline McGlade said: “Emissions increased in 2010. This rebound effect was expected as most of Europe came out of recession.

“However, the increase could have been even higher without the fast expansion of renewable energy generation in the EU.”

The figures were verified by member countries and submitted to the United Nations’ climate agency. The emissions for last year are still being calculated but data from the EU’s emissions trading scheme indicate a 2% decrease.

The trading system covers about 40% of the EU’s emissions, but not sectors such as transportation, household heating and agriculture.

Despite the increase in 2010, the 27-nation bloc is on track to meet its emissions targets under the Kyoto protocol, a 1997 climate accord limiting the emissions of most industrialised countries, the EEA said.

Fifteen EU countries are committed to an 8% reduction in greenhouse gases in 2008-12 compared with 1990 levels. The other 12 countries have individual targets except Malta and Cyprus.

The EU has agreed to extend the Kyoto pact when it expires at the end of this year, but other developed countries such as Canada, Japan and Russia do not want to join a second commitment period.

The US never ratified the Kyoto accord, saying it was unfair because it did not include China and other major emerging economies, and that it would hurt the US economy.

More on this topic

David Attenborough to lay out ‘vision’ for the future in new bookDavid Attenborough to lay out ‘vision’ for the future in new book

Applications open for €11m fund for Midlands transition from peat to green energyApplications open for €11m fund for Midlands transition from peat to green energy

Proposal to use Midlands as a major hub for renewable energyProposal to use Midlands as a major hub for renewable energy

Scientists find climate change tipping point for tropical forestsScientists find climate change tipping point for tropical forests


More in this Section

Politicians ejected in Hong Kong debate on Chinese anthem billPoliticians ejected in Hong Kong debate on Chinese anthem bill

South Korea virus cases make biggest jump in 50 daysSouth Korea virus cases make biggest jump in 50 days

Boeing to cut more than 12,000 US jobsBoeing to cut more than 12,000 US jobs

Starry, starry night hidden by light pollution for majority, count findsStarry, starry night hidden by light pollution for majority, count finds


Lifestyle

Some days you’ve got to make your own sunshine, writes Annmarie O'ConnorTrend of the Week: Escape from lockdown loungewear with these creative closet options

Children’s author Sarah Webb didn’t want sixth class pupils to miss out on their graduation, so to mark their end of year she organised a series of inspirational videos delivered by well-known Irish people, says Helen O’CallaghanIrish celebrities help students say goodbye to primary school

We are all slowing our pace and appreciating the wonders around us, says Peter DowdallMagical maple holds us spellbound

Sustainable gardening tips and a fascinating documentary are among the offerings on your TV todayThursday TV Highlights: A Prime Time look at how schools will cope in the Covid era features in today's TV picks

More From The Irish Examiner