EasyJet says passengers not at risk as pilots 'played with Snapchat at 30,000ft'

EasyJet says passengers not at risk as pilots 'played with Snapchat at 30,000ft'

EasyJet has said footage of two of its pilots playing a Snapchat game while flying a plane full of passengers "falls short" of its standards but insisted the safety of travellers was not compromised.

In a video published by The Sun, the co-pilot can be seen completing paperwork with a virtual owl dancing on the screen beside him.

Later, the co-pilot dances next to an animated character with the aircraft said to be at 30,000ft during a trip from Paris to Madrid.

Low-cost airline easyJet said the video was taken during cruise control and the flight operated safely but it would be speaking to the pilots involved.

A spokesman added:

Whilst at no point was the safety of the passengers compromised, this falls short of the high standards easyJet expect of its pilots. We will speak to the pilots involved.

The footage was posted on the captain's social media accounts, according to The Sun, which said passengers branded the actions "irresponsible".

- PA

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