Donald Trump reveals his 'overweight' status; recovering Clinton to release medical information

Donald Trump reveals his 'overweight' status; recovering Clinton to release medical information

Donald Trump has revealed his weight on US television, admitting it makes him overweight for his height.

The Republican presidential candidate said in a phone interview with Fox and Friends that he is 6ft 3ins and 236 pounds (16.8 stone), giving him a body mass index falling into the "overweight" range.

Mr Trump discussed the results of his physical ahead of the airing of a taped interview with TV personality Dr Oz.

He said his health is good, though he would like to lose 15 pounds. He said his cholesterol is "quite good" and that he had "every single test" and they are good.

He said: "If they were bad, I would say, let's sort of skip this, right?"

Asked about reports that he weighs more than 236, Mr Trump joked: "Ay-ay-yi, it's bad enough."

It comes as the campaign focuses on the health of candidates after Mr Trump's Democratic rival Hillary Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia.

Her illness became public after she left Sunday's 9/11 memorial service early and was seen on video staggering while getting into a van.

"She is recovering well with antibiotics and rest," said her doctor, Lisa Bardack, in a letter released by her campaign.

The episode fuelled long-simmering conservative conspiracy theories about Mrs Clinton's health. It also provided a fresh line of attack for Mr Trump, who has frequently questioned whether she has the stamina to serve as commander in chief.

Mr Trump is also suggesting that, if he is elected president, he would sell some foreign assets to avoid potential conflicts of interest.

He was asked during Fox and Friends how he would respond to potential sanctions imposed on a country that might hurt his company or hotels.

He said he "would absolutely get out in some form". He said: "If it's ownership, we'd have to sell."

Mr Trump has a long list of potential conflicts of interest thanks to his dealings with foreign companies and governments.

He said, if elected, he would "sever connections" with his company. His adult children and executives would run it and not discuss it with him.

Other elected officials have put their assets in "blind trusts" to avoid potential conflicts.

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