Denmark investigates nine dead swans

At least nine dead swans have been found on Danish islands in the Baltic Sea, near the German island where two birds were discovered that tested positive for the H5N1 bird flu strain.

Tests were being conducted on the birds by the Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research to establish the cause of death.

Today, experts from a German medical institute said preliminary tests on samples from two dead swans found yesterday on the Baltic Sea island of Ruegen were positive for H5N1. They were Germany’s first known cases of the disease.

Of the birds found dead in Denmark, five were on Falster Island, about 31 miles north-west of Ruegen, and four were on Bornholm Island, just south of the southern tip of Sweden.

The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration urged all farmers to keep poultry indoors to prevent their coming into contact with infected migratory birds. A formal ban on keeping fowl outdoors was expected in a few days, it said.

More on this topic

Officials discover bird flu in wild bird in Co. TipperaryOfficials discover bird flu in wild bird in Co. Tipperary

Bird flu prevention zone declared across England to protect poultryBird flu prevention zone declared across England to protect poultry

Dutch farmers ordered to keep poultry indoors after bird flu discoveryDutch farmers ordered to keep poultry indoors after bird flu discovery

Bird flu ban lifted on free-range poultry, health chiefs confirmBird flu ban lifted on free-range poultry, health chiefs confirm

More in this Section

Johnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UNJohnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UN

Labour faces Brexit policy battle at party conferenceLabour faces Brexit policy battle at party conference

Global youth protests urge climate actionGlobal youth protests urge climate action

Epstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claimsEpstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claims


Lifestyle

Against popular wisdom and flying a plane made from bamboo, wire and bike handlebars, a Co Antrim woman blazed a sky trail for aviation and for the independence of women, writes Bette BrowneMagnificent Lilian Bland blazed a trail for independence of women in her plane of bamboo

The epic battle for the bridge at Arnhem, as depicted in the blockbuster 'A Bridge Too Far', saw the Allies aim to end the war by Christmas 1944, but failed as a huge airborne assault force failed to take the last bridge across the Rhine. In an extract from his latest book 'A Bloody Week', Dan Harvey tells the story of one of the hundreds of brave men from Ireland who gave their all to the Allied campaignThe bridge to war: Dan Harvey's new book looks at the Irish who went a bridge too far

More From The Irish Examiner