Democrats sue Trump campaign, Russia and WikiLeaks over election 'conspiracy'

Democrats sue Trump campaign, Russia and WikiLeaks over election 'conspiracy'

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) has sued US president Donald Trump's campaign, his son, his son-in-law, the Russian Federation and WikiLeaks, claiming they conspired to help Mr Trump win the 2016 presidential election.

The DNC filed the lawsuit today in federal court in Manhattan.

It seeks unspecified damages and an order to prevent further interference with DNC computer systems.

The lawsuit claimed Mr Trump and his associates had relationships with Russia that enabled the creation of a Trump-Russia conspiracy.

[media=digiteka]vfmu3v[/media]

The DNC said Russia "mounted a brazen attack on American democracy", beginning with a cyber attack on its computers.

It said the hack penetrated DNC computers and phone systems and extracted tens of thousands of documents and emails.

Mr Trump has said repeatedly there was no collusion between his campaign and Russia.

DNC chairman Tom Perez said in a statement: "During the 2016 presidential campaign, Russia launched an all-out assault on our democracy, and it found a willing and active partner in Donald Trump's campaign."

He called it an "act of unprecedented treachery".

The lawsuit also accuses Donald Trump Jr of secretly communicating with WikiLeaks, saying the president's son was offered a password to an anti-Trump lawsuit in one exchange.

The lawsuit blames the president too, saying he praised the illegal dissemination of DNC documents throughout the autumn of 2016, making it a central theme of his speeches and rallies.

The lawsuit said Mr Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, was part of the conspiracy as a senior adviser and key decision-maker in the campaign. It said he began in June 2016 to control all campaign data-driven efforts, beginning with the establishment of a 100-person "data hub" in San Antonio, Texas, and by hiring Cambridge Analytica, the social media and analytics firm.

The lawsuit said the conspiracy "inflicted profound damage upon the DNC", costing it donations and preventing it from communicating the party's values and vision to voters, as well as sowing discord inside the Democratic party itself.

"The conspiracy constituted an act of previously unimaginable treachery: the campaign of the presidential nominee of a major party in league with a hostile foreign power to bolster its own chance to win the presidency," the lawsuit said.

"And, in carrying out this effort, defendants' conspiracy to disseminate documents stolen from the DNC in violation of the laws of the United States as well as the laws of the state of Virginia and the District of Columbia. Under the laws of this nation, Russia and its co-conspirators must answer for these actions."

- AP

More on this topic

Despite mounting evidence, one prominent hole remains in case against TrumpDespite mounting evidence, one prominent hole remains in case against Trump

Trump awards medals to Jon Voight and Alison KraussTrump awards medals to Jon Voight and Alison Krauss

Impeachment and the wider world: Case against Trump very different than Clinton or NixonImpeachment and the wider world: Case against Trump very different than Clinton or Nixon

Impeachment inquiry told of US ambassador’s ‘political errand’ for TrumpImpeachment inquiry told of US ambassador’s ‘political errand’ for Trump

More in this Section

French women demand action on domestic violence deathsFrench women demand action on domestic violence deaths

What are the legal implications of Andrew’s offer to make a statement?What are the legal implications of Andrew’s offer to make a statement?

Coroner in UK warns surgeons over ‘butt lift’ op after woman’s deathCoroner in UK warns surgeons over ‘butt lift’ op after woman’s death

Tributes paid to veteran British political journalist Chris Moncrieff who has died aged 88Tributes paid to veteran British political journalist Chris Moncrieff who has died aged 88


Lifestyle

REVIEW: This superb adaptation of A Christmas Carol puts a contemporary twist on Dickens' classic tale, writes Alan O'RiordanReview: A Christmas Carol, Gate Theatre, Dublin

Move over quinoa.Everything you need to know about fonio, the ancient grain we’ll all be eating in 2020

The former heptathlete and all-round super woman chats to Lauren Taylor about how to stay fit in pregnancy and body confidence after a baby.Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill: ‘There’s still a lot of stigma attached to exercising pregnant’

Behaving aggressively is a stage many toddlers go through. The author of The Wonder Weeks explains how parents should deal with kids who kick & bite.Ask an expert: How can I stop my toddler kicking and biting?

More From The Irish Examiner